why did british soldiers march to lexington and concord in april 1775?
Things came to a head on April 19, 1775, in the small towns of Lexington and Concord. On this night in 1775, Paul Revere was instructed by the Sons of Liberty to ride to Lexington, Mass., to warn Samuel Adams and John Hancock that British troops were marching to arrest them. Lexington and Concord: The Beginning of the War of the American Revolution, by Arthur B. Tourtellot (W.W. Norton & Co, 1959). On the evening of April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage sent approximately 700 British soldiers out to Concord (about 18 miles distant) to seize and destroy military stores and equipment known to be stockpiled in the town. On April 18, 1775, British troops left Boston headed for the towns of Lexington and Concord. The Revolutionary War Trust's (formerly Campaign 1776) map of the Battle of Lexington and Concord - Parker’s Revenge. Why did the british troops march from Boston into the countryside April 1775? ... To enforce taxing in the colonies. The British were marching toward Lexington and Concord because they wanted to seize and destroy arms and ammunition stockpiled by American militias in Concord. British retreat: Battle of Lexington and Concord 19th April 1775 American Revolutionary War: picture by Amos Doolittle from eyewitness accounts This success encouraged the spirit of revolt across the American colonies and was the immediate cause of New York being seized for the revolution. Disorganized, shocked by the exchange, and tending to their wounded, the American militia did not immediately follow the British troops. The Battles of Lexington and Concord, 1775 By April 1775, reconciliation between England and the thirteen colonies had failed. Two months earlier, Parliament had declared Massachusetts to be in a state of rebellion, and on April 14 General Thomas Gage received secret orders from England to … read more Why did the British army march on Lexington and Concord? Colonial militiamen successfully laid siege to the British-held city of Boston. Facing the threat of rebellion, British General Thomas Gage hoped to prevent violence by ordering the seizure of weapons and powder being stored in Concord, Massachusetts, twenty miles northwest of Boston. When Joseph Warren (1741-1775), a Boston patriot, discovered that British troops were on the march, he sent Paul Revere (1735-1818) and William Dawes (1745-1799) to ride to Concord to warn the people about the approaching forces. Things came to a head on April 19, 1775, in the small towns of Lexington and Concord. the next morning. On the night of April 18, 1775, 700 British soldiers began to march toward Concord. When Joseph Warren (1741-1775), a Boston patriot, discovered that British troops were on the march, he sent Paul Revere (1735-1818) and William Dawes (1745-1799) to ride to Concord to warn the people about the approaching forces.

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